Honeychick Homestead

Homestead, Health, and Happiness

Quick Update on Verbena Colony

4 Comments

Things are “buzzing” around here 🙂 Here’s a quick update on what’s been happening since I shook the bees into their new home.

The next morning, the 100 or so bees that I couldn’t shake in were huddled together, trying to keep warm. It was about 46 degrees out, so I’m surprised they made it. I was also surprised that I stood right next to them, and not one moved. By that afternoon, those bees made their way out of the package, and into the hive.

I didn’t like the entryway feeder, so I picked a top feeder at Mountain Feed. It holds a lot more food, aka sugar syrup, and doesn’t need to be refilled everyday. It’s a box with two reservoirs, with a small opening in between them that they can fly up to get their food. There is a floating grate in each reservoir so they won’t drown. It sits nicely on the top, and is covered to keep pests, and other animals away.

Once the sun comes up, and it’s warmed to about 60 degrees, a few come out, and fly around. As it gets warmer there is more activity, and they seem to be foraging during the day. I’m sure they’ll be happy when my lemon trees bloom!

I will attempt to release “Lorde” (the queen) from her cage this weekend, and see if she’s accepted. If accepted, she can roam free inside the hive and begin to lay eggs. If not, I’ll need to wait a few more days, and try again. I’ll update you on how that goes this weekend. Here’s a Wikipedia link about bees, it explains their roles, life-cycle, and much more. It has some great pictures too. Enjoy!


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Author: Jen @ Honeychick Homestead

Honeychick Homestead is about more than urban homesteading. Here you'll find a mix of diverse topics, about health, real food, Lyme Disease, and my newest adventure, urban homesteading!

4 thoughts on “Quick Update on Verbena Colony

  1. How do you catch Lorde if she isn’t being accepted? How can you tell?

    • Oh I guess I should’ve included that in the post 🙂 thanks for asking! I’ll remove her cage from the frame & monitor the bees behavior. If they seem aggressive, clinging to her cage, or biting the wire they haven’t accepted her yet. If I remove her cage & they are interested but not aggressive, then she can come out. And once I open her cage, I have to make sure she doesn’t fly away……should be another exciting day!

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