Honeychick Homestead

Homestead, Health, and Happiness


1 Comment

Hearty Beet Soup

P1050073I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with beets! If someone else prepares them in a salad or soup, I usually love them. If I prepare them, I usually hate them!

My only experience using beets that I made and enjoyed was when I juiced them.

Until now!!

I found a great, flavorful, beet soup recipe in my Straight from the Earth cookbook. This is a vegan cookbook I got as a gift. I made a few important changes, like not using the canola oil, that makes it more real food friendly 🙂

If you want to know more about why I avoid canola, and other vegetable oils, click here and here.

Okay now for the recipe!

Serves: 4-6  Prep Time: 20 minutes  Cook time: 45-50 minutes

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Apple and Spice, Slow Cooker, Steel Cut Oatmeal

IMG_5205

Ready for overnight cookin’

On cold mornings, I love a bowl of hot oatmeal! Back in the day, I’d microwave Quaker Instant Oatmeal almost every morning. My favorites were maple and brown sugar, and apples and cinnamon.

I now know how much healthier it is to make oatmeal from scratch. It’s especially easy if you cook it overnight. I was inspired by this slow cooker recipe I found at The Yummy Life. I added some extra spice, and changed a few things to make it more “real food” friendly.

One of my favorite things about this recipe is how amazing it smells when you wake up in the morning. As with every recipe, try to use as many organic ingredients as possible 🙂

Serves 6 -7.  Prep time: 15 minutes  Cook Time:  8 hours or overnight

Continue reading


1 Comment

Aloo Gobi Matar

IMG_5182

This recipe is to good not to share! It is the perfect warming veggie dish for fall. The only thing I did different was use butter, instead of ghee. This is one of my new favorites!

 

The Domestic Man

Gluten-Free, Paleo, Perfect Health Diet

Earlier this year I wrote a guest article for Paleo Magazine, emphasizing the importance of eating vegetables. Americans tend to give vegetables a lower priority than the rest of the world; when comparing the most economically developed areas of the United States (those with the most money to spend on food) to similarly developed regions in Europe and the Western Pacific, we only eat about 75% as many vegetables as the other regions. Comparing the lesser economically developed areas of the United States to their global counterparts is much worse: there, we eat only around 35% as many vegetables.

Vegetables are an important factor in overall health. While not as nutrient-heavy as organ meats, fish, seafood, and naturally raised ruminants, they are often superior to pork, poultry, and fruit in terms of nutrient density. Fermented vegetables, a food that has been consumed for thousands of winters, also provide unique…

View original post 94 more words